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20121205
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Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)
if this book were hotter? what would it do to the table? energy would cascade from the book to the table until they both became the same temperature and they will level off. so that alcohol that's poured on your back has the same temperature as anything else around, but it feels cold. and why does it feel cold, gang? because what is that alcohol doing? what it's doing is what we're gonna be talking about today. it's changing state. it's changing from the liquid state to the gaseous state, okay? and we call that what? begin with ev? evaporation. evaporation, that's right. and we're gonna be learning that evaporation is a cooling process. you know, sometimes you're swimming and you come out and you're all wet, a little breeze come by and you feel kinda chilly. but if no breeze comes by, you don't feel so chilly. and what's going on? when that breeze comes by, what happens to the water on your body? evaporates. it evaporates. when it evaporates, how does your body feel? begin with a c. - cool. - cool. now, we're gonna ask the question hc. why is it that evaporation is a cooling process? and we ca
military leaders talked about alternative energy production and the country's dependence on oil. speakers included gene sperling, director of the white house international council, and republican senators. hosted by securing america's future energy, this is about an hour-and-a-half. >> good morning, everyone. thank you all for coming. i especially want to thank the members of the energy security leadership council for being with us today. they have been a distinguished group of people working on this issue since 2006. we are nothing without their credibility as the great ceo's, an entrepreneur, and military leaders of our time. i also want to give a special>> i want to give a special thanks to the staff at securing america's future energy. we stand on the shoulders and the time it takes to get these reports. the policy staff, james, leslie, the staff that puts these together, our political staff and the rest of the team at safe. we're seeing more production than we have ever seen before. the most production in the last couple of decades of year on year growth. oil imports are falling. the
as a promising future energy source. >> translator: as one of the world's largest oil producers iraq offers a wide range of opportunities. >> reporter: chinese firms were prominent. the state run oilompany has already won the contract to double up a huge oil field near the city. >> iraq is new market. it's booming for oil and gas. i see the risk. they're so nice. >> reporter: security remains precarious since the start of the 2003 iraq war. a string of terrorist attacks rock the country after the last u.s. troops pulled out a year ago. three major ethnic and religious groups are still jostling for control of political power, territory and all revenues. >>> north korea has announced it will extend the period for iraq's oil men minister has set an ambitious target. launching what it calls a >> translator: we welcome companies and want to show them what they can do to develop basra. >> reporter: iraq is now in a better position to attract investment with neighboring iran conquered by sanctions on its nuclear program. satellite carrying rocket by one it has overtaken iran to become the second l
mornings to talk about the wind energy industry and the importance of the trucks tax credit. but before -- and the importance of the production tax credit. before i begin i'd like to associate myself with the majority leader's remarks. we do need to extend the tax cuts for the middle class as soon as possible. that's clearly the message the american people sent on november 6 in the nationwide election that we had. i also want to respond to the comments and the conversation between the two leaders over the debt ceiling limit. it's important to recognize that when we raise the debt ceiling all we are doing is keeping faith with what congress has already appropriated, what congress has already made clear we will spend on behalf of our country and all the various ways that the federal government operates. we cannot afford to have a situation like we had august before last where we dallied and we literally shot our economy and ourselves in the foot by not extending the debt ceiling. we saw one of the rating agencies lower our national rating; first time in history. there is a way to do this
energy. all that is important. we have to keep that going. that will get hard because we will face is demographics. that is my 74th birthday on april 7. i am aware of the and aging population which i have become and we are an aging population relative to what we were. luckily, we have millions of fresh arrivals that are younger and are energetic and they come from all over the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader of the known world in a few hundred years? it expanded its territory by plunder, by what ever. details. it was not pretty. [laughter] it added people, it kept getting bigger and incorporated the people and to roman citizenship. it became very consolidated, expanding group of energetic people. and they'll work. they were not just a bunch of talkers, they were doing. -- there were doers. -- they were doers.
happening, so your point to stick around a bit longer. what is that like? >> your energy is reverberating, is the way i can describe it. you can feel it, but you cannot see it. things are exploding. maybe it is something lyrical, with a collaborator, and we are working on something. you can feel that there is an energy going back and forth, and then, "when this is done, we have to go in there and make sure we can put that down, and it is just like an energy that is happening. basically, what happens is you do not pay attention to the time. tavis: and then it is 5:00. >> and then whatever time it is, it is. it is natural. it just happens, in there is. tavis: yes. you mentioned collaborating. this, to my mind, and you know your stuff better than i do, but to my mind, this is one of the most collaborative projects. >> it is. it is. i am never done a collaborative project. there was something that i wanted to start to see what would happen when i combined with people from totally different spaces than me, you know? and it was something like an experiment, i guess. it was kind of like being fr
, petroleum-based fuels, but i think this is huge. the energy from the stove can also be used to charge your cell phone or other electronic devices. can you imagine the millions of people in the northeast that were without power and gasoline in hurricane sandy had these camp stoves handy? the blackout would have been a lot more pleasant and i wouldn't have had to worry every minute that my phone would die, which was really my chief -- when i was trying to do this phone downtown. my phone kept dying. plus of course there are billions of people in the developing world who don't have access to power but they do have access to cell phones that need charging and they cook using wood-burning fires every day. which is why biolite's also testing a large stove for homes that produce electricity. this is an amazing invention and i think it could change the lives of billions of people. which is why i'm thrilled to have biolight's ceo and its chairman here with us tonight to talk about the revolutionary products. mr. sear, mr. levy, welcome to "mad money." >> thanks very much. >> good to see you. >> goo
. they note that during the first nine months of 2012 china's energy consumption fell by 3.4% from the previous year. >> translator: we made a commitment at our party congress. we prioritized building and eco friendly society. we'll make a strong effort to promote a recycle-based society. china will act on climate change with other nations. >> some delegates also want reassurance on financial support. wealthy countries have pledged to provide $100 billion per year in aid by 2020. the money is intended to help the developing countries reduce carbon emissions and adapt to the effect of climate change. time is running out for the delegates to reach a deal. many divisions remain between the participants from the industrialized and developing nations. now it may be up to the ministers attending talks to steer the conference towards a successful conclusion. >>> chinese police have detained petitioners planning to voice their complaints about corruption to the state-run broadcaster. hundreds of beijing police officers stood outside china's central television on tuesday. it was the 30th an
gordon brown. to his own personal mission about child labor. a clean, domestic energy future that puts us in control. our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cleaner electricity, putting us to work here in america and supporting wind and solar. though all energy development comes with some risk, we're committed to safely and responsibly producing natural gas. it's not a dream. america's natural gas... putting us in control of our energy future, now. have led to an increase intands clinical depression. drug and alcohol abuse is up. and those dealing with grief don't have access to the professional help they need. when you see these issues, do you want to walk away or step up? with a degree in the field of counseling or psychology from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to make a difference in the lives of others. let's get started at capella.edu a regular guy with an irregular heartbeat. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke
. i see this when i travel. a huge commitment to public resources. huge energy to enthusiasm of higher education. india wants 1500 new universities by 2020. alicia's in a meeting about hong kong this week. i learned that hong kong university is expanding undergraduate education from three years to four years because they think it is not giving students enough time. there are all these buildings going up. here we are being told in the united states that maybe we should reduce ourselves from four years to three years. another aspect. let me insert here so much of what our discussion is about. with travel to india and china ever was to hear about the liberal arts. they want to introduce a broader education into their countries. they think that the ability to imagine, it to be creative, and to envision a world differently relates to understanding other places and people. these are so much a part of the humanities and social sciences. it is the whole panoply of the liberal arts. this is under tremendous pressure. there are recognizing this advantage. why do we want to spend our time on a br
is that senators will devote much more of their energies to governance. in a perfect world, we would not only govern, we would execute a coherent strategy. that's a very high bar for any legislative branch to clear, but we must aspire to it in cooperation with the president, because we are facing fundamental changes in the world that will deeply affect america's security and standard of living. the list of such changes is long but it starts in asia with the rise of china and india as economic, political and military powers. the obama administration has conspicuously announced a pivot to asia. at the center of this pivot is china, which exists as both an adversary to certain u.s. interests and a fellow traveler sharing mutual goals and vulnerabilities on others. the ongoing challenge will be for the united states to disce discern, sometimes issue by issue, whether china is an adversary or a partner. and this calibration will impact america's relations with the rest of asia and may ultimately determine prospects for war or peace in this world. while visiting indonesia, thailand and the philippi
energy markets. the obama administration has said the study will be central to the decision on whether to export. he said exporting the gas would be a bigger impact on the economy. >> slap in the face of dow chemical. of coke, not coke the beverage company. but this was something that was hotly disputed within the romney campaign. he really let this stuff go because the romney campaign had some very big givers that were chemical companies. >> do we know, say, very bad, how much will prices conceivableably go up if we become an exporter of natural gas? is it that great a difference? >> we burn offer more natural gas than we use. burn off, in other words literally, you see those flames, we flare more than we use. so we got a real excess of this stuff. >> the government says that the -- 6.6% of current u.s. consumption. >> why would prices move that dramatically at all? wouldn't they just come down globally? >> the average, our $16 goes to $4. it costs $7 to get stuff from the united states. >> you should argue that they should go down because they went be the only one. dominion has brooi
, canada has given china's state-run energy firm cnoc the okay to buy nexen. >> some are calling this pivot towards china after a lot of back and forth. ottawa over the weekend approved china's largest foreign takeover ever. cnooc has been given the green light to acquire canadian energy company nexen for $15.1 billion. now, the cnooc deal is the one getting all the attention. here is why. it would give a huge china eeps state run enterprise a firm foothold in canada's oil sands. third only behind saudi arabia and venezuela. it was not an easy decision for the prime minister and his conservatives. he had to walk a fine line, appearing open to investments and diversifying canadian energy exports away from the u.s. but not appear to go be giving china control of northern albert ya's oil sands. so he will allowing the deal, but harper says this is not a garage sale and he will not give an approval the next time to foreign state observed enterprises. >> a series of large scale, controlling transactions by foreign state-owned companies could rap idealy transform this industry from one that is es
business with key sectors in the iranian economy, with energy and ship building and shipping and the ports, this amendment that would shut down businesses that are involved in sectors which fund the proliferation activities of iran and that regime is crucial. in addition, the amendment is going to prohibit business with all designated persons connected to the iranian government. it bans trades and commodities used in these key sectors and used to stop iran from receiving payment in gold or using oil payments in local currency then to buy gold and we have to stop an effort to water down these sanctions. i say that because i remember the votes in the past. i remember our effort on the central bank. it was only because we got unanimous votes because we got so much support that we were able to deploy those. but let me add that there is another portion of the amendment here that targets the regime for their human rights abuses. and i think one of the areas where we've been short, for those of you who have talked to to those in the prison there and experienced the torture, who have seen the murd
sheets as he just said, steady cash flow, growing dividends, also global energy and emerging markets. they are very bullish on domestic plays in brazil specifically and china. rob telling me he thinks latin-america is on fire. north asian cyclical stocks. mexican banks and industrials. then they move on to discounted exporters on europe's periphery. you have to be careful there. but if you want it add risk to your portfolio, that's where they are going. and small self help united kingdom company. >> a very eclectic mix. >> i was at world economic forum, the winter world economic forum in china. >> right. >> that's all anything anybody was talking about. what they were talking about is businesses building product for internal consumption. that's where the growth will come from. >> that's why when the trade figurers came out in china, people weren't concerned about it. they were more concerned about their own internal growth. >> and that policy makes that shift to a more balanced policy. >> well watch this market closely with you guys. thank you so very much, ty, over to you. >> fed ch
't believe going over the cliff will stifle energy command. today is the first day when the group got any lift at all. so what do we do? people are worried the economy is slowing because of the cliff. so what do we do? is it game over for equities should i take my -- hall of fame today and just go home? no, no, no. let me first say absolutely not. we simply have to get eveninger to a cliff resolution or to a situation where no one expects resolution. going with the latter, hey, that is new. let me walk you through here. today last week. last week, genuine hope a deal would get done. today, last week. if you recall, we heard from a host of executives. they met with the president. came out, the mic in their faces. they felt like compromise was in the air. compromise was real, imminent. even heard from the always skeptical ceo of goldman sachs. far apart. it could be hammered out without real difficulty if it were in the private sector. behind the scene, from skeptical to more positive. when i heard those execs touch base with them and spoke with them on both sides of the aisle i thought the
business with key sectors in the iranian economy, with energy and shipbuilding and shipping and ports, this amendment that would shut down businesses that are involved in sectors which fund the proliferation activities of iran, of that regime, is crucial. in addition, the amendment is going to prohibit business with all designated persons connected to the iranian government. it bans trade and commodities used, it is designed to stop iran from busting sanctions by receiving payment in gold or using oil payments in local currency to buy gold. we have got to stop an effort to water down these sanctions. i say that because i remember the votes in the past, i remember our effort on the central bank. it was only because we got unanimous votes because we got so much sport that we were able to deploy those. let me add there's another portion of the amendments here that targets the regime for their human rights abuses and i think one of the areas where we have really been short, for those of you who talked to those who have been in the prisons, who have experienced the torture, seen the murder
put all of his time and energy into restoring this world war ii tugboat, the eugene h. the elderly mattingly stayed late last night to work on it. >> last night, for some reason, he didn't want to leave yet. >> reporter: that was around 5:30 p.m. this morning, mattingly'sson found the doors to the tugboat open, and the coffee pot cold. two things his father wouldn't have done. >> he's definitely determine. in an abundance of caution, we're trying to utilize all the resources we have available to us. >> reporter: friends and family have already prepared themselves for the worst. >> it's going to be rough around here. coming down here, and he's not here, is going to be a real change. >> reporter: these are the filled containters the elderly man lifted onto his truck. the son found his medicine from yesterday. it appears his father did not take it. vallejo police will reassess tomorrow morning whether or not to search the water again. >>> gang violence strikes near a popular holiday destination in the south bay. the family celebrated the holiday, a teen was stabbed. >> reporter: chris
zeros in on a failed stimulus attempt, and it usually involves a green energy company that they tried to put money into to sort of prop them up, and then the market said, no, no, we still want our suvs, we want our gas guzzlers, and we know it's bad for the environment, but we love 'em. and they're so big, and they hit so many kids. but whatever, the white house responds by saying it's like anybody's investment portfolio, you've got winners and losers. and, you know, we tried, and they're not all going to be great and, of course, the press is going to focus on the ones that lose, and i imagine they would say this is another example of that happening. >> this is true. that's what they will say. the problem for the president is that the losers are very famous, and they're very notable. solyndra, and we've had solar firms, other solar firms, a123 battery is now famous because of the china sale going on right now. so for the president whatever he says about the unfairnesses of being judged by these failures, the truth is they stick out so much, and the president can say that over time the
. -- it was in the 1990's. because we are more competitive on energy prices and people are saying we will be relatively competitively on the energy price component and construction and cost, i think there is reasonable evidence we are starting to pull in more manufacturing. we may have hit the bottom the started in 1979. there is a reason for hope. i think the metaphor is the automobile out. there might even be more policy there. i cannot imagine if there is an aggressive policy on manufacturing and construction -- that is another word for infrastructure, and there might be some hope, especially for less skilled mails. >> i am glad anthony mentioned energy cost. we have done even mention climate change, which i think is going to be -- it all way -- already is a major issue for the world to face. it will only grow in importance and significance. looking at the development boom and the potential for shell gas and shale oil is a real opportunity and challenge. an opportunity for significant economic growth, an opportunity to move away from dirtier fossil fuels and maybe served as a bridge into renewable e
to inject some energy in the right place at the right time. next appear will be senator sam nunn, longstanding german and senate armed services who understands our country and national security as well or better than anybody that i have ever worked with. thanks to pete peterson for getting this group together and for so much else and for michael and the peterson foundation have done in terms of bringing attention to the fiscal challenge we face and mobilizing support for the rational and moral mullen thank you for the tremendous leadership and for the citizens and the recent months you have led the statement that basically the biggest risk that we have to national security is our debt and unsustainable fiscal policy is one that i totally endorse and agree with and i commend you for making it because your impact is very powerful so that is my first point. my second point is that even if we avoid the short term debt crisis, the so-called cliff, and i hope that we will, the interest on debt in the years to come will increasingly dominate the budget and pressure defense in a very ser
energy which i think is a love story on a very high-refined level. it's sort of a divine love that, say, you or i wouldn't be able to appreciate. and they had this, this union, i suppose, where they sort of circled each other, and he observed her, and i think she observed him. when she died at the age of 24, it was april 17, 1680, immediate will have after her -- immediately after her death, her body was transfigured. and there are two written accounts which are part of that book right there which was part of her cause over if rome. now, she's already passed away, she's only 24 years old, and she was a recluse. she only had a couple of female friends that knew her very well, but for the priests. and she started this curing, and she started affecting substantial cures. women in childbirth were having breach birth, and he would apply dirt from her grave or pieces of her clothing, and they'd burn some of her granters and they -- garments, and they made a tea out of it. these miracles can kept up until about 1760 when the english came in and took canada back or took canada from the french,
, but as 2012 dawns, our group green climate fund remains empty. the international energy agency tells us we have five years until the widow to avoid irreversible climate change closes. the science tells us we have five years maximum. you are seeing -- saying, give us 10. the most stark a trailer your generation's responsibility to ours is that you call this ambition. where is the courage in these rooms? now is not the time for incremental actions. in the long run, these will be seen as the defining moments of an era in which narrow self interests prevailed over science, reason, and compassion. there is real ambition in this room, but it is being dismissed as a radical, deemed not politically possible. stand with africa. long-term thinking is not radical. what is radical is to completely alter the planet's climate to betray the future of my generation and to condemn millions to death by climate change. what is radical is to write off the fact that change is within our reach. 2011 was the year in which the sun and jordy found their voice, the year when the bottom shook the top. 2011 was the y
, there is this real energy around compromise. thinking about four years from now, the end of obama's second term, by that time you think the economy will improve? 51% say it will improve, and 39%, and economic well-being of the middle class -- i have to catch up with my slides here. there we go. the deficit and that will improve is 34%. the one thing they are certain is taxes will increase and government spending will increase. in the next four years, how effective do you think the government will be on each of the issues? this is how it basically stacks up. insuring long-term future entitlement programs, social security, medicaid, 65% think that what happened. 64% say creating jobs, 64% say improving public education, growing economy, and lowering the federal deficit falls down at 48%. not as much confidence there as there are on the other items. we then said the united states faces a number of challenges, including large budget deficits, national debt, slower economic recovery from the recession, high unemployment, and a deep political divide on many issues. do you believe we will overcome the
, it is your work on sanctions especially energy sanctions, that, i think has been critical and, i want to say congratulations. i saw, i saw director woolsey when i came in and i so much appreciate the briefing we have received from him and the ability to get the type of analysis also from cliff and mark and the whole fdd team. it's so helpful. if you were to ask me what is going to be the focal point of, what's the main concern we have, i think it has been and is going to continue to be iran for the foreign affairs committee and i think the administration frankly has, has lagged far behind the house. we've been far ahead in pressuring iran and a lot of that is because of your help. i think we have been united in the house in our effort to do that. i think that congressional pressure frankly is building, building quickly, in light of recent events and i'm looking forward of course to the conference report that we're going to see now from the national defense authorization act where we're going to have another chance to tighten thes into and i want -- the noose, i want to say that the ndaa amen
any other city, like bombay or cairo. there's a wonderful energy, amazing pace. it has all the other things these cities have in terms of life and excitement and thrills. there are other -- there are other times when the city is a city under siege, you know, the bbc estimates this year alone, and by this year, i mean until the beginning of august, some 300 people were assassinated in the city, some 300 political activists killed in extrajudicial killings, which is familiar for those who lived through the 1990s. it's a pattern we see repeating itself. >> presumed this is basically a gang war between the mqm and -- >> it's ethnic, political, turf, and it's reared its ugly head again, and violates mutates in that city, and before 2005, or even, yeah, well, you know, it was embassies targets of violence rather than people. it was mcdonald's, it was, you know, but the city adapts, and it adopts itself to the violence of the region, and of the country, and now people have watched the floods that have devastated the country and particularly in recent weeks, the provinces, and so the city is
when the survey was done. fiscal cliff didn't seem to have as much energy around t.each day that passes we're hearing from our clients, we're going to hold off and we have to make sure. it's really the quickness in which they can do this. >> i was going to ask you if you did that survey today, i wonder whether or not the hiring plans would be a little bit different. if we go into recession or are go over the cliff, what do you think the survey results would look like? >> it's a great question, and, you know, of course, you can't get down to what those 18,000 employers would really say now because some still have demand and some would be less impacted and more impacted. we look at our clients and what they are trying to do right now. 27% in this survey said there would be no change, and the reason this number is high and higher than we've seen, they are holding their hands tight. okay. what do i do? don't know what to do, but we're hearing also, you know what, as your previous guest said if i had some certainty i would feel a little bit better about hiring some people and adding that cos
, with those comments, again, as a strong supporter, because of energy and environment, because of congestion, still remain dedicated to moving positive inner city passenger rail and particularly high-speed service as the united states is falling further behind and must lead the pack instead of being behind the pack. with those quick comments, let me go the patient ranking member who is so nice to me yesterday. i have to be very nice today. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i've disappointed -- i know -- >> never going to hang there. >> nothing can move don young from the center. >> nothing. >> takes five people to move. >> that's right. >> so, thank you mr. chairman. mr. chairman, i've been involved in the issue of high and higher speed rail since early on in my career, in the 90s, al swift on the appropriations committee, designated the first proposed five high-speed rail routes in america and one of them was from eugene, oregon to vancouver, british columbia, and we will hear a bit later from paula hammond this secretary of transportation in my state, who will describe our progress, or lack ther
of capability, maybe in the long term that provides access to and declare weapons. so we see nuclear energy, for example, power plants that going to come to the region relatively soon if the arab springs does not interfere with those plans. the idea, the projections that are on the books come to be realized. what the motivations might be, many factors. first, it's very difficult for nuclear-weapons. you run into all the kinds of problems therein, now confronting both technical and political because we would certainly pushed back on any of the state's bill we are seeking to acquire nuclear arms. moreover, many of these states are very dependent on us, even saudi arabia is dependent on us to protect the right now and to provide advanced military equipment. that relationship is completely endangered if there seemed to be moving down the wrong track. at the same is true for egypt. maybe algeria, whatever other states you might want to identify. turkey is a nato ally and already under nuclear umbrella. in force that relationship by providing patriot missiles. so just give you the briefest overvi
in energy and commerce. thank you for your service and friendship. it is hard to go through this list. mr. miller, this is a wonderful privilege to say thank you, the countless hours that you could add up for the service to constituents and the tremendous leadership within this body and these members who have given their all and will not be back at the 113th. it's important to say their names and to honor them and give them credit for what they have done. joe baca has been a fixture for the central valley and agriculture, someone who has agriculture number one in my district as well. but there is much to remember joe baca for and his contributions in agriculture and the financial services committee as well. my colleague, former colleague, bob filner, who has already assumed another position within our government, as mayor of san diego. i think of bob filner and i think of veterans' issues and he was a college professor before he came to congress, as my husband was and reached out to each other in that capacity. he has worked hard on veterans' issues. i have 50,000 veterans in my district.
use as many smart people as we can here. working on new technologies and new energies to have a robust economy. we're not going to grow more than 2%, which is current growth rate unless we innovate more. that will require entrepreneurs. we will not get unemployment down significantly below 8% unless we innovate more. as mark said at the beginning, almost all of the net jobs in the last 30 years have been created by young, high-growth companies so this is the place to focus. >> right here. second row. >> thank you. my name is ed bell from alexandria. i'm proud father of a fourth year at president sullivan's fine institution. the topic i have on my mind is at an intersection of the areas of interest of our fine panelists and that is online education. keck tivety, -- connectivity, internet, greater trend towards access education, making the great institutions that we have in this country available to people throughout our country and throughout the world either inexpensively or in many cases for free. and this creates in some sense a competitive landscape force across the world where we'r
a cute, younger guy. cramer becomes addicted to 5-hour energy and george's parents get skype. in another tweet, get this, jerry breaks up with a beautiful woman because she favorites every one of his tweets and cramer and newman start a podcast. >> so easy to assemble a monkey could do it. check this out. a monkey in a coat was spotted roaming around an ikea in toronto. a bunch of tweets went out, one asking, anyone lose their monkey? the answer, yes, the owner was apparently shopping inside the store and the monkey managed to get out of his crate and out of the car. animal control captured darwin, the 7-month-old primate. since monkeys are banned as pets there, guess what, he loses his monkey. >> it would be malpractice with us not to share it. >>> the late-night talk show hosts got caught up in this monkey business as well. take a look. >> this is true. a tiny monkey wearing a winter coat was found wandering around an ikea. do we have a photo of the monkey? look at that, that's real. a monkey wearing a coat. >> that's a sheerling coat. >> that monkey still has a better chance of assemb
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)